E-debates

A series of e-debates on WASH in Schools topics taking place in 2012.



WASH in Schools e-debate results feed into key international working groups

Over the past three months, IRC has had the pleasure of hosting three e-debates around topics  inspired by questions asked during the implementation of the SWASH+ Project, an action-research school WASH project in Kenya. The results from the debates have infiltrated key international working groups. These include the JMP post-2015 working group, the Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSanA) and the UNICEF WASH in schools working group. The three e-debates attracted 27 participants who submitted 31 arguments in total.

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Will local governments ever be able to meet policy obligations for WASH in schools? Join the debate!

You are invited to join the 3rd and final e-debate on WASH in Schools, inspired by lessons from the SWASH+ Project.  It will take place from 5-23 November.

The focus on this last e-debate is on whether local governments will or will not be able to generate enough resources to meet their policy obligations. 

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External funding for WASH in Schools does not necessarily undermine national & local commitment

A narrow majority of participants in an e-debate did not think that external funding for WASH in Schools undermines national and local commitment. From 1 - 12 October 2012, 15 participants discussed the issue of external funding in the second of three e-debates inspired by the SWASH+ Project. One of the participants adequately summarised the debate noting “It is difficult to place oneself on the yes or no side of this argument. In an ideal situation – that most of us are striving for – school WASH would be provided by governments. This is the end game, but we are clearly not there yet.”

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Does external funding for WASH in Schools undermine national and local commitment? Join the debate!

You are invited to join the second in a series of three e-debates on WASH in Schools, inspired by lessons from the SWASH+ Project. It will take place from 1-12 October. The key question that we are raising in this e-debate is: When NGOs, donors and other stakeholders fund direct delivery of school WASH services do they undermine the commitment of national governments and communities to do so?

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The JMP Post-2015 indicators on WASH in schools are a step in the right direction

The JMP Post-2015 Working Groups have proposed targets and indicators for WASH in schools to be included in future global monitoring of water, sanitation and hygiene. Have they got it right or should they start again from scratch? Overall, most participants in an e-debate on this topic think that they did get it right, but that the indicators still needed refining to make them really useful and easy to monitor.

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Join the e-debate: Are the JMP Post-2015 indicators on WASH in Schools a step in the right direction?

Do you want to influence the global Post-2015 WASH agenda? Do you want to ensure that WASH in Schools gets the prominence it deserves? If you do, then join the e-debate on the JMP Post-2015 indicators for WASH in schools. The results will serve as an input for the public consultation of the JMP Post-2015 Working Groups, which ends on September 20, 2012.

The e-debate starts 3 September and is this first in a series of three on WASH in Schools scheduled for the coming months. The topics are inspired by questions asked during the implementation of the SWASH+ project, an action-research school WASH project in Kenya. Make your voice heard and join in on http://washurl.net/bg3fhz!

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E-debates inspired by SWASH+ project

There are three WASH in Schools e-debates scheduled for the coming months. The e-debates are taking place in the first week of September, October and November 2012 respectively and will focus specifically on WASH in Schools issues. The topics are inspired by questions asked during the implementation of the SWASH+ Project, an action-research school WASH project in Kenya.

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Video

Sanitation on the other side of the wall

A passionate school teacher took the lead in making his school a model in sanitation. However, the ground in front of the school is an open defecation area. This is the case at the government primary school in Madanpur Khadar, a resettlement colony on the periphery of Delhi. The school headmaster, Shamin Ahmed, with the support from a local NGO, CASP Plan (a Program Unit of Plan India), has made tremendous efforts towards improving the water and sanitation conditions in the school, which had very challenging circumstances. The headmaster has been proactive in mobilizing funds to make school toilets functional and water accessible to the children and taught them hygiene practices.

Ironically, while the efforts inside the school are towards a sanitized environment, the school boundary wall on the outside is used by the community members for open defecation.

Sanitation on the other side of the wall