SWASH+ Photo Essays

Photo essays created for the SWASH+ programme on topics which arose during the project period:



Anal cleansing in rural Kenyan schools

Anal cleansing is a taboo subject that is often overlooked by researchers and program staff. The SWASH+ Project conducted focus groups with male and female 12- to 15- year-old students in rural Kenya and collected data from teachers and parents to understand students’ anal cleansing practices and beliefs.

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Clean water access for students

Schools that do not have direct access to clean water face many problems. Some schools have to fall back on water from unhealthy sources such as rivers, lakes and creeks. Other schools ask students to bring water from home, but teachers are worried that this system makes it difficult to ensure good water quality.

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The plight of school WASH in rural Kenya

Funding for water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) in Kenyan schools’ budget is a fraction of what is needed. Schools are forced to make choices between maintaining WASH improvements and other expenditures such as upkeep of classrooms.

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Bringing safe water to Kenya's schools

Each morning students of Atela Primary School in Sondu, Kenya are responsible for collecting and bringing water to school. Water from home is transferred to larger vessels and used throughout the day for washing hands and drinking. Treating and providing clean drinking water at schools can help students return each day in good health.

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Schools get resourceful

Creative ways to fund and supply school WASH in rural Kenya. Teachers, community members, parents and students come together and contribute to sustaining school WASH.

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School handwashing: barriers and benefits

Handwashing is a key component of water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) programs. Handwashing also reduces the spread of illness; however, many barriers exist for providing handwashing supplies at Kenyan schools.

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Pupil power: student action brings WASH-changes

Photo essay showing how a school in Kenya had to take matters into their own hands with the help from their own pupils when it came to maintaining their facilities.

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