Call to Action

A Call to Action for WASH in Schools campaign ( www.unicef.org/wash/schools ) was launched in 2010 calling on decision makers to increase investments and on concerned stakeholders to plan and act in cooperation – so that all children go to a school with child-friendly water, sanitation and hygiene facilities.



Meeting report - The Hague WASH in Schools Meeting

Meeting report of the WASH in Schools meeting organised by IRC, UNICEF and WASH in Schools Partners in The Hague, Netherlands, 24th – 25th May 2011. Aim of the meeting being to encourage development partners to work on strategies to follow up the Call to Action for WASH in Schools.

Report - WinS Meeting - IRC - May 2011 - Final.doc (1.3 MB)

The Hague WASH in Schools Framework for Action

Key challenges and recommendations that came out of the WASH in Schools meeting that was held from 24-25th of May 2011, in The Hague, The Netherlands.

The Hague WASH in Schools Framework for Action - Final.docx (30.9 kB)

WASH in Schools Meeting in Europe, The Hague, 24-25 May 2011

This 2 day meeting aimed to bring together WASH in Schools advocates from various organisations based in Europe (Ministries, UN agencies, Academia, Foundations, and non-governmental organisations) to help development partners’ work on strategies to follow up the Call to Action for WASH in Schools.

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Presentations Meeting The Hague

All the presentations given during the Call to Action meeting in The Hague, 24 and 25 May 2011.

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Video

Yes, hygiene and school enrolment are directly proportional

In Bangladesh the standard number of toilets in schools has been set as a minimum of one toilet for every 60 students. However, this is far from being achieved. On average, schools in Bangladesh have half the number of toilets required. However, although 94 per cent of schools have latrines within the compound, a large number remain unusable because they are dirty or broken. In Bangladesh, the lack of separate latrines for girls and menstrual hygiene facilities in secondary schools are major factors in the disproportionate rate of absence and dropout of adolescent girls.

Yes, hygiene and school enrolment are directly proportional